Coconut Yogurt

Fiendishly simple, this fluffy coconut cream based “yogurt” uses water kefir (tibicos) as the fermentation agent. It creates a light, fluffy (almost like whipped cream), effervescent texture, and a slightly tangy flavor.

Coconuts are one of Nature’s most abundantly nutritious gifts. The flesh contains lots of vitamins, amino acids, and the fat is a MCT (medium chain triglyceride), easily metabolized by the liver and considered a “good” fat.

Both coconut cream and coconut milk will work fine. Coconut cream will make a slightly thicker finished product. Wondering the difference between coconut milk and coconut cream? It’s mainly the concentration of coconut. They are both made with coconut, water, and guar gum as a thickener (even the organic brands usually add guar gum). Don’t worry; that additive does not affect the fermentation (although other ingredients like preservatives may well do so). My typical advice is look for brands with the fewest ingredients (and ones a 10 year old can pronounce).


Vegan Coconut Yogurt
Prep time: 
Fermentation time: 
Yield: 16 oz
 
Ingredients
  • 1 can (13.5 oz or 400 ml) coconut milk or coconut cream
  • 1 can (13.5 oz or 400 ml) coconut milk or coconut cream
  • ¼ cup (60 ml) plain (unflavored) water kefir
Instructions
  1. Shake coconut cream well before opening. Stir to mix the "fat cap" into the cream.
  2. Add cream to a quart-size mason jar along with the water kefir.
  3. Close lid tightly on jar.
  4. This should ferment in 2 to 3 days. The volume will increase as the fermentation occurs and creates bubbles.
  5. Store in refrigerator. Lasts up to 2 weeks.
  6. Some settling of water may occur. Prior to serving, rock the closed jar back and forth a few times to reincorporate the mixture.

3 thoughts on “Coconut Yogurt

  1. Vanessa Reply

    What does the temperature need to be at for proper fermentation for your recipe? I’ve seen other recipes that used probiotic capsules with the proper strains to induce fermentation, but the heat needed to be around 100-105F. Also, know of any place in SD where I can just buy plain water kefir?

    Thanks!

    • Austin Post authorReply

      Room temperature worked fine for us, although since it is the cool season, it took 3 days. In summer it may have only taken 1 or 1/2 days. 100F may make sense if you’re using human-grade probiotics as your starter (since our body temp is about 100). Water kefir ferments at room temps (68 to 85) so it does not need to be that warm.

  2. Pingback: Sweet-Spicy Soaked Nuts – Fermenters Club

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.